Thinkers I appreciate

People whose brains I like.

Sal Khan

Bud Caddell

David Simon

Jason Fried

Tony Hsieh

Edward Snowden

  • Arguing that you don’t care about the right to privacy because you have nothing to hide is no different than saying you don’t care about free speech because you have nothing to say. 🔗

  • While I pray that public awareness and debate will lead to reform, bear in mind that the policies of men change in time, and even the Constitution is subverted when the appetites of power demand it. In words from history: Let us speak no more of faith in man, but bind him down from mischief by the chains of cryptography. 🔗

  • Nobody needs to justify why they “need” a right: the burden of justification falls on the one seeking to infringe upon the right. […] Arguing that you don’t care about the right to privacy because you have nothing to hide is no different than saying you don’t care about free speech because you have nothing to say.

  • I am more willing to risk imprisonment, or any other negative outcome personally, than I am willing to risk the curtailment of my intellectual freedom and that of those around me, whom I care for equally as I do for myself.

  • on Wikipedia

Glenn Greenwald

[Regarding people who say they have “nothing to hide” with regards to government surveillance…] The people who are actually saying that are engaged in a very extreme act of self-deprecation. What they’re really saying is, “I have agreed to make myself such a harmless and unthreatening and uninteresting person that I actually don’t fear having the government know what it is that I’m doing.” This mindset has found what I think is its purest expression in a 2009 interview with the longtime CEO of Google, Eric Schmidt, who, when asked about all the different ways his company is causing invasions of privacy for hundreds of millions of people around the world, said this: He said, “If you’re doing something that you don’t want other people to know, maybe you shouldn’t be doing it in the first place.” […] The very same Eric Schmidt, the CEO of Google, ordered his employees at Google to cease speaking with the online Internet magazine CNET after CNET published an article full of personal, private information about Eric Schmidt, which it obtained exclusively through Google searches and using other Google products.

quote via Greenwald’s TED talk “Why Privacy Matters”

Tom Scott

Kevin Rose

  • his podcast/series, Foundation has great interviews with a bunch of interesting thinkers (with a focus on startups/entrepreneurs)

Andreas Antonopoulos

Peter Thiel

Aaron Swartz

  • The Joker had by far the most interesting plan: he hoped to out-corrupt the corrupters, to take their place and give the city ‘a better class of criminal. […] And the crazy thing is that it works! […] The movie concludes by emphasizing that Batman must become the villain, but as usual it never stops to notice that the Joker is actually the hero.

Tim Ferriss